Hockey! Did Someone Mention Hockey?

OK, we’re jumping the gun a bit here.  But the Muskie try-outs at the RCC got the ole “Let’s Play Hockey” juices flowing.  The girls should be pretty good this year – pretty much have all of last year’s team back.  And we have some really good (was going to use “pretty good,” but I used up my allotments of “pretty” in the previous sentence) players – it remains to be seen whether any will be of all-state caliber, but depth should be exceptional.  We’ll still have to deal with the likes of a Rasmussen from Sartell, a definite D-1 college player.  But first, a poem.  OK, it was suppose to be a narrative poem, but it turned out just narrative.  We were given 20 minutes to write it in the “Everybody Has a Story” Community Ed series and this was as far as I got:

[It was a small, but elite, group at the class.]

WRITE YOUR OWN STORY: NARRATIVE POEM 

[From “Everyone Has A Story” Community Education Series – I hosted David Bengston on October 17, 2001, at Nelson Gables.  During the class we were given 20 minutes to write about an object brought to class – I brought a Bemidji State hockey puck.]

It was the winter of 2003.  Our second winter in Minnesota.  I had recently read a story in the local newspaper about the girls’ high school hockey team.  We did not even have a boys’ high school hockey team in my day; and, of course, there were no girl sports, at all!

So I decided to find out what it was all about.  We were not going to be snowbirds, so we were in search of winter entertainment.

Minnesota girls always skated, of course – but in figure skates.  Their skating strides mimicked those of straight ahead cross-country skiers.  Boys wore hockey skates, and skated in the herringbone cross-country ski style – powerful side-to-side strokes bending forward at the waist.

I can still recall that first hockey game.  The girls came out of the locker room and hit the ice in full stride – skating like boys!  Maybe it’s the chauvinism in me – having grown up in an era when girls didn’t play sports – but I found myself mesmerized as these girls went through their warm-up drills looking every bit the polished athletes I had no clue existed.

I was hooked.  I went to every game by myself.  I sat in the “home adults” section in the stands.  I was the only one there.  The only adults who ever came to games were parents – and they sat together with the students.  After several games, the parents – well, the hockey moms – decided to approach this strange old man who sat by himself at the games.

At first they thought I had to be a grandparent of one of the girls.  After all, only relatives came to games.  We got to know each other and I was accepted.  I eventually talked other non-relatives into joining me at the games.  We were amazed at the abilities . . .

The preceding explains the proceeding.  As a kid, I played pick-up hockey or batted a puck around maybe ten times a winter.  There was no organized hockey – remember?  I believe by the time I reached high school I could finally raise the puck off the ice.  Forty years later I watched junior high girls tuck wristers into the upper corners of the net.  By the time I was a senior I thought I had a pretty respectable slap shot.  After I saw 8th-grader Ashley Holmes blast a few from the blue line, I would have been ashamed to call mine a “slap shot.”   So we watched and became Super Fans.  This summer we’re sure our stalwarts tossed cabers and jogged through the logging trails with pianos on their backs.  ‘Tis hockey, after all!  Accordingly, the following is photographic retrospective – back to the beginning.  Some of the photos are mine; many are stolen from mulitple sources or were thoughtfully “donated.”  The photos will be displayed randomly – except for the beginning where we will feature this year’s sisters.  Sisters appear to be invaluable to the success of hockey teams.  Pay close attention – there will be a test at the end, a variety of 9 multiply choice, 9 true-false, and a 9-minute essay.  That’s right: 9-9-9:

[Becca (37) and Claire (3) Illies – there is another Illius coming.]

[The Illiuses with Shelby Iverson]

OK, Claire is gone now.  The world’s toughest 80-pounder.  She went on to become a Concordia Cobber.  She tryed out for the hockey team.  There were 16 players, including two D-1 transfers, vying for 3 openings.  She made the team.

[Stephanie and Melissa Drown.  I believe there are more Drowns on the way.]

[Kalley (10) and Quinn Kragenbring (20)]

[Sara, Andrea, and Alison Toft – sisters from a by-gone day.]

If a techno-geek would like to put these photos to music – I would suggest “Ride of the Valkyries” by Wagner – that would be wonderful!  🙂  The girls’ season unofficially begins on November 5 with an all-day scrimmage invite.  In this world of ever increasing scheduling conflicts, we will be at Basketball Dan’s annual turkeyfest that day.  And always remember, when Abby Williams was once asked why she wore pink laces in her skates – her response was, “because it makes me look tough!”

About tomobert63

The Journey Begins Thanks for joining me! This is the follow-up to the original, “alexandriacardinals.wordpress.com,” which overwhelmed the system’s ability to handle it any more. Thus, this is “Part 2.” As the original was initially described: 10-26-07-4 “It all began in a 5,000 watt radio station in Fresno, California” . . . wait a minute, that was Ted Baxter on the Mary Tyler Moore Show! Let’s see . . . oh yeah, it all began in 2003 when retirees, i.e., old people, in Alexandria, Minnesota, who had no desire to become snow birds, went looking for mid-winter entertainment here in the frozen tundra of West Central Minnesota. We discovered girls’ high school hockey, fell in love immediately, and it remains our favorite spectator sport to this day. Initially, and for several years, reports on these games were e-mailed to those who were actually snowbirds but wanted to keep abreast of things “back home.” It was ultimately decided a blog would be more efficient, and it evolved into a personal diary of many things that attracts tens of readers on occasion. It remains a source of personal mental therapy and has yet to elicit any lawsuits. ~ The Editor, May 9, 2014 p.s. The photo border around the blog is the Cardinal girls’ hockey team after just beating Breck for the state championship in 2008. It’s of the all-tournament team. The visible Breck player on the left is Milica McMillen, then an 8th-grader – she is now an All-American for the Gophers. The Roseau player in the stocking cap I believe is Mary Loken, who went on to play for UND; and the Cardinal player on the right, No. 3, is Abby Williams, the player we blame most for making us girls’ hockey fans who went on to play for Bemidji State. *********************************************************************************** Photos contained herein are available for personal use. All you have to do is double click on any of the photos and they will become full screen size. You can then save them into your personal “My Pictures” file. They make lovely parting or hostess gifts, or holiday gifts for such as Uncle Ernie who wants to see how his grand niece is doing on the hockey team. If any are sold for personal profit, however, to, for example, the Audubon Society, National Geographic, Sven’s Home Workshop Monthly, Curling By The Numbers, or the World Wrestling Federation, I only request that you make a donation to the charitable organization of your choice. You have two hours and fifteen minutes. Pencils ready? Begin! **********************************************************************************
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to Hockey! Did Someone Mention Hockey?

  1. susan says:

    really loved the pictures and the story. what funvery good pictures also. susan

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s